33333333 11111111111 Other challenges and restrictions for women’s organizations to implement their work – GNWP
Other challenges and restrictions for women’s organizations to implement their work

Impact on women’s rights organizations and peacebuilding organizations

Other challenges and restrictions for women’s organizations to implement their work

COVID-19 has disrupted the work of many civil society organizations who work to promote and protect women’s rights, build inclusive and sustainable peace. Women peacebuilders – including GNWP and its members around the world – have seen their work curbed by the mobility and travel restrictions and suspension of grants, leaving them and the communities they work with, gripped by uncertainty. The digital divide for grassroots women peacebuilders contributes to their inability to work online, participate in online meetings and conference calls, or access the internet, as some Ukrainian women’s rights activists shared with GNWP.

In Colombia, women peacebuilders have shared that the pandemic has “put the brakes” on women’s political participation, especially at the local level. Planned consultations and other participatory processes had to be cancelled, and mass protest marches and public demonstrations that have been ongoing since 2019 were disrupted. While some women have been able to move their organizing and advocacy online, others were not able to do so. For example, women in the Ariari region in the Meta department were unable to participate in the advocacy related to the local development plans because they didn’t have access to the necessary infrastructure and equipment (including phones or smartphones, and internet), and lack skills to use the virtual platforms. In Northern Ireland, some of the work done by women peacebuilders – including on national reconciliation and social cohesion – had to be put on hold, as members of communities do not feel comfortable speaking about certain issues in virtual spaces.

Explore the data in the dashboard to learn more.