Category: Colombia

Category: Colombia

Media as an Ally in Peacebuilding, Women’s Rights and Gender Equality

May 3, 2021

By Wevyn Muganda, GNWP’s Cora Weiss Peacebuilding Fellow and Michaela Zelenanska, GNWP’s Peacebuilding Program Intern for Eastern Europe and South Caucasus

The Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (GNWP) celebrates World Press Freedom Day by highlighting the importance of independent media in building peaceful, gender-equal, and inclusive societies. Journalists play a key role in spreading information about the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda and in highlighting women’s roles as leaders, peacebuilders, and decision-makers. GNWP’s “Full-cycle Implementation” of WPS strategy incorporates the critical work of the media, taking a multidimensional approach across three main areas:

  1. Training of journalists and other media practitioners, to increase their understanding of their role in promoting the implementation of the UN Security Council Resolution 1325 and the supporting WPS resolutions and encourage them to portray women in their diverse roles including as leaders, peacebuilders, and decision-makers;
  2. Development of Media and WPS strategies to guide stronger and more systematic collaboration between the media, women peacebuilders and national and local government actors; and
  3. Media and WPS (#MediaFor1325) competitions, to create incentives and recognize the gender-responsive coverage of issues related to peace and security.

The #MediaFor1325 competitions provide an incentive for journalists to integrate a gender lens into their reporting on peace and conflict issues, and raise awareness of the WPS agenda. As a result, they contribute to shifting the perception of women as passive victims to recognizing women as agents of peace. Since 2018, the GNWP in partnership with the Austrian Development Agency (ADA) and the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad) held six media competitions in Colombia, Georgia, Moldova, Kenya, the Philippines, and Ukraine.

This year, we commemorate World Press Freedom Day with a throwback to some of the winning materials.

The work of women peacebuilders in Colombia has been indispensable to reaching and signing the peace agreement between the government and Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC or the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia), and remains critical in monitoring its implementation. It is important that the invaluable contribution of women peacebuilders in Colombia is recognized and made visible to change the public narrative on women’s role in peace processes and in leadership. GNWP, in partnership with Red Nacional de Mujeres (RNM) and with support from Norad, trained journalists on the WPS agenda and the role the media plays to promote effective implementation. The training was followed by a national #MediaFor1325 competition organized in August 2020, in partnership with Pacifista – a media collective dedicated to promoting journalism rooted in peace and human rights principles. The competition had two categories: professional journalists and journalism students. Additionally, a special prize was awarded for work that provided an original angle on women’s leadership in peacebuilding. The winning podcast, by Lidha Beltrán Valero, highlights women’s experiences in challenging patriarchy, preventing violence and sustaining peace in local communities. Jeimmy Lorena Gutiérrez Turmequé, with her piece about Indigenous leaders from Xuacha, was awarded the students category and the special prize.

With support from ADA, GNWP and its Georgian partner, Women’s Information Center (WIC), organized an online training series for journalists. The training aimed to increase the awareness of Georgian journalists on their roles in supporting gender equality, women’s meaningful participation in the implementation of Georgia’s National Action Plan on UNSCR 1325, and in promoting gender- and conflict-sensitive responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. The journalists expressed appreciation for the knowledge and skills they acquired and committed to being more gender-sensitive in conflict reporting in order to influence the public narrative on women’s roles in peace processes. The training was accompanied by a national #MediaFor1325 competition. The winning article by Nino Chibchiuri discusses the lives of women on the occupation line and how the pandemics negatively affected them. Other awarded articles feature women entrepreneurs and the struggles of peace activists in Abkhazia. “During the pandemic, rural women showed solidarity with each other and helped others as much as they could,” Chibchiuri stressed.

“Rural women during the pandemic showed solidarity with each other and helped others as much as they could.” -Nino Chibchiuri, 2020 winning journalist in Georgia

In Ukraine, GNWP and Democracy Development Center have conducted a series of training with journalists since 2017. These trainings have been instrumental in raising the journalists’ awareness of their important role in shaping public opinions on women’s leadership in peace processes. It has also become pivotal in integrating the media in the implementation of the WPS agenda. The 2020 media competition was organized in partnership with Ukraine’s State Radio and Television Broadcasting Commission. Dmytro Semenyuk’s winning entry focuses on breaking stereotypes and highlighting the active role women play in patrol policing to prevent violence. “Women have become indispensable in resolving conflicts,” Semenyuk expressed.  Olga Chernykova, the author of another winning article describes an inspiring life story of a woman journalist who had to flee her home city due to the violent conflict.

These powerful stories show that women around the world share similar struggles and continue to work for the advancement of women’s rights, peace, and justice in their communities. On this World Press Freedom Day, GNWP commits to continue to work with journalists in amplifying the voices of women peacebuilders across the world!

Changing the narrative: Colombian reporters put women’s peacebuilding work in the spotlight

(Español abajo.)

January 6, 2021 by Cecilia Lazara

Recognizing the critical role women play in the prevention and resolution of conflict and crisis is one of the central tenets of the landmark United Nations Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1325. Women are at the forefront of peacebuilding and addressing the root causes of conflict in their communities. Recognizing and supporting their leadership is not only right – but it is also strategic. Empirical evidence shows that when women are actively involved in peace negotiations, peace agreements have a higher probability of being more durable and sustainable over time. Colombia has been a key example of this- women negotiators and civil society were critical in reaching the peace agreement between the government and the FARC. They also ensured that the peace agreement is inclusive and addresses the needs of those most vulnerable. Moreover, after the adoption of the peace agreement, women have been monitoring the progress in its implementation and advocating for the institutionalization of its provisions – especially those related to gender equality – at the local level.

Women peacebuilders continue to demonstrate their adaptability and resilience in the face of emerging crises. Following the outbreak of COVID-19, women have become first responders to the pandemic. In Colombia, women peacebuilders have distributed food, hygiene packages, and sexual and reproductive health products to those most vulnerable, while continuing their advocacy to implement the peace agreement.

However, the work of women peacebuilders often remains invisible, and therefore unrecognized. Colombian women’s efforts to advance peace agreement implementation, address the root causes of conflict in their communities, and respond to the impacts of COVID-19 have been dismissed as part of their “care duties”. Therefore, they are taken for granted as a characteristic of female nature, diminishing the skills and sacrifices they require. Despite their contributions, the dominant narratives commonly depict women as passive victims, rather than acknowledging their leadership and agency. This narrow outlook perpetuates gender stereotypes inherent in the patriarchal system and restricts the spaces and opportunities available to women to advance their work.

Safeguarding spaces for women peacebuilders and ensuring their meaningful participation in decision-making at all levels is one of the key elements of the Women, Peace, and Security (WPS) agenda. To fully implement the agenda, we must shift the victimizing narrative and highlight women-led efforts to build just and inclusive societies. Journalists and media professionals are critical allies in this regard. They shape how women are perceived in society, stimulate debates about gender equality, and promote women’s roles as peacebuilders and agents of change. Likewise, they can also report on the status of national policies to provide the civil society with the information necessary to hold the government accountable for the implementation of UNSCR 1325 and the peace agreement and ensure that women are meaningfully included in it.

Recognizing the key role played by the media in the operationalization of WPS on the ground, the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (GNWP) and Red Nacional de Mujeres (RNM) have worked with journalists across Colombia to increase the awareness of the WPS agenda, their understanding of their own role in advancing it, and their capacity to integrate gender-responsive analysis in their reporting. In 2018 and 2019, with support from the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad) and the Global Affairs Canada Peace and Stabilization Operations Program (PSOPs), GNWP and RNM held two trainings to enhance journalists’ capacities to advance the WPS implementation through gender-responsive and conflict-sensitive reporting, and to challenge traditional and conservative discourses.

In August 2020, with the support from Norad, we launched the National Media and WPS Prize, in partnership with Pacifista – a media collective dedicated to promoting journalism rooted in peace and human rights principles. The National Media and WPS Prize aimed to encourage professional journalists and students to reflect on women’s experiences by submitting written articles, audio, and audiovisual materials.

The materials were evaluated by a panel of peacebuilding and media experts. Winners were identified into two categories: professional journalists and journalism students. Additionally, a special prize was awarded for work that provided a particularly original angle on women’s leadership in peacebuilding. The winner of the special prize will travel to the Philippines to closely observe and document good practices on the implementation of UNSCR 1325 and the peace agreement and compare them with experiences in Colombia.

Please see below a summary of the recognized materials:

The podcast follows three women living in the North of Cauca: an indigenous leader, an ex-combatant, and an indigenous guard. It highlights their efforts to achieve women’s rights in the midst of armed conflict, calling them “the resistance within the resistance.” Thus, it sheds light on women’s work to build sustainable and gender-equal peace – including through supporting women’s economic empowerment, challenging the patriarchal culture, and addressing the continuum of violence in rural areas, even after the internal armed conflict. Women are resisting and raising their voices to change the course of history.

This podcast tells the stories of four community leaders who have been fighting for the vindication of women’s rights and peacebuilding in the municipality of Xuacha, Cundinamarca. Xuacha is seen as a place where all the problems converge, but at the same time, it features a glimmer of hope personified in grassroots leaders. The podcast presents a type of leadership that realizes the meaning and importance of UNSCR 1325 on the ground.

The special prize was awarded to Jeimmy Lorena Gutiérrez Turmequé. The student’s workclearly outlines women leaders’ efforts amid increased threats and barriers to their work – such as increasing gender-based violence, the killing of social leaders, and the growing inequalities caused by neoliberal economic policies. Its fundamental contribution lies in the fact that it sheds light on the women’s movement and the grassroots leaders often ignored by the mainstream media, but essential to prevent conflict, promote peace and stability.

GNWP congratulates the winners! We also want to thank all those who participated in the competition. This is a key step to strengthening the alliance between the media and women peacebuilders to create awareness and promote the WPS agenda’s core values. We look forward to further strengthening this partnership!


Cambiando la narrativa: reporteros colombianos colocan el trabajo de las mujeres constructoras de paz en el centro de la escena

El 6 de enero 2021 por Cecilia Lazara

Distinguir el papel fundamental que desempeñan las mujeres en la prevención y resolución de los conflictos es considerado uno de los elementos centrales de la histórica Resolución del Consejo de Seguridad de las Naciones Unidas (RCSNU) 1325. Las mujeres se posicionan a la vanguardia de la consolidación de paz, abordando las raíces de los conflictos en sus comunidades. Por tanto, reconocer y apoyar su liderazgo no solo es lo correcto, también es estratégico. La evidencia empírica ha demostrado que cuando las mujeres participan activamente en las negociaciones de paz, los acuerdos tienden a tener una mayor probabilidad de ser más duraderos y sostenibles a lo largo del tiempo. Colombia representa un claro ejemplo de esto. Allí, las mujeres negociadoras y la sociedad civil han sido fundamentales para concretar el acuerdo de paz entre el gobierno y las FARC, asegurándose que su carácter sea inclusivo y aborde las necesidades de las poblaciones más vulnerables. Asimismo, luego de su adopción, las mujeres siguen monitoreando los avances en su implementación y abogando por la institucionalización de sus disposiciones a nivel local, especialmente aquellas relacionadas con la igualdad de género.

Paralelamente, las mujeres constructoras de paz continúan demostrando su capacidad de adaptación y resistencia frente a las crisis emergentes. Tras el brote de COVID-19, han estado en la primera línea en respuesta a la pandemia. En Colombia, las mujeres se han ocupado de la distribución de alimentos, paquetes de higiene y productos de salud sexual y reproductiva destinados a personas vulnerables, a la vez que continúan con su labor de defensa y promoción para la implementación efectiva del acuerdo de paz.

Sin embargo, a menudo, su trabajo permanece invisible y no se lo reconoce como se debería. Por lo contrario, los esfuerzos de las mujeres colombianas tienden a identificarse como parte de sus “deberes de cuidado”. Por tanto, su labor se da por sentado como una característica de la naturaleza femenina, menospreciando las habilidades y los sacrificios que conlleva. A pesar de sus contribuciones, las narrativas dominantes suelen representar a las mujeres como víctimas pasivas, en lugar de reconocer su liderazgo y agencia. Esta perspectiva reduccionista solo sirve para perpetuar los estereotipos de género inherentes al sistema patriarcal y limita los espacios y oportunidades disponibles para que las mujeres avancen en su trabajo.

Es por ello que uno de los elementos primordiales de la agenda de Mujeres, Paz y Seguridad (MPS) consiste en salvaguardar los espacios para las mujeres constructoras de paz y asegurar su participación significativa en la toma de decisiones en todos los ámbitos. No obstante, para poder implementar plenamente la agenda, es necesario cambiar la narrativa victimizante y destacar los esfuerzos liderados por mujeres para construir sociedades justas e inclusivas. En este sentido, los periodistas y los profesionales de los medios son aliados fundamentales ya que describen la manera en cómo se percibe a las mujeres en la sociedad, estimulan los debates sobre la igualdad de género y promueven su papel como constructoras de paz y agentes de cambio. Asimismo, también sociabilizan la información sobre el estado de las políticas nacionales; componente clave que ayuda a la sociedad civil a ejercer presión sobre el gobierno para que rinda cuentas sobre el avance de la implementación de la RCSNU 1325 y el acuerdo de paz, y garantice la inclusión significativa de las mujeres.

La Red Global de Mujeres Constructoras de Paz (GNWP, por sus siglas en inglés) y la Red Nacional de Mujeres (RNM) reconocemos el papel fundamental desempeñado por los medios de comunicación en la operacionalización de la agenda MPS sobre el terreno local. Es por ello que trabajamos junto con periodistas para aumentar la sensibilización de la agenda en Colombia, facilitando la comprensión del rol que los medios ocupan en su promoción e incentivando el desarrollo de las capacidades periodísticas con el fin de integrar un enfoque sensible al género en los informes. Durante el 2018 y 2019, GNWP y RNM realizó dos capacitaciones con el apoyo de la Agencia Noruega de Cooperación para el Desarrollo (Norad) y el Programa de Operaciones de Estabilización de la Paz de Asuntos Globales de Canadá (PSOPs). El objetivo de estos talleres se centró en el avance de la implementación de la MPS a través de un periodismo con perspectiva de género y construcción de paz, capaz de desafiar los discursos tradicionales y conservadores.

En agosto de 2020, se lanzó el Premio nacional de periodismo Mujeres, Paz y Seguridad, con el apoyo de Norad, y en asociación con Pacifista, un colectivo de medios dedicado a promover el periodismo arraigado en los principios de paz y derechos humanos. El Premio nacional de periodismo MPS tuvo como objetivo alentar a los estudiantes y periodistas profesionales a reflexionar sobre las experiencias de las mujeres a través de textos, audios y materiales audiovisuales.

Todos los materiales fueron evaluados por un panel de expertos en construcción de paz y medios de comunicación. A su vez, los ganadores fueron clasificados en dos categorías: periodistas profesionales y estudiantes de periodismo. Además, se otorgó un premio especial para el trabajo que destacara un ángulo original sobre el liderazgo de la mujer en la consolidación de paz. Como resultado, el ganador del premio especial viajará a Filipinas con el propósito de observar de cerca su plan de acción y documentar la implantación de buenas prácticas de la RCSNU 1325 y el acuerdo de paz, para luego compararlas con la experiencia de Colombia.

Se presenta a continuación un resumen de los materiales reconocidos:

  • En la categoría de periodistas profesionales, la pieza ganadora fue: “La Resistencia en medio de la resistencia” de Lidha Beltrán Valero – disponible en https://soundcloud.com/rutas-del-conflicto/podcast-la-resistencia-en-medio-de-la-resistencia
    El podcast sigue la historia de tres mujeres que viven en el norte del Cauca: una líder indígena, una excombatiente y una guardia indígena. En él, se destacan los esfuerzos por la obtención de los derechos fundamentales de las mujeres en medio del conflicto armado, llamándolas “la resistencia en medio de la resistencia”. Este relato pone de relieve el trabajo de las mujeres en la construcción de una paz sostenible y con igualdad de género –  apoyando el empoderamiento económico de la mujer, desafiando la cultura patriarcal y luchando contra la violencia continua en las zonas rurales, incluso después del conflicto armado interno. Las mujeres no se rinden, resisten y alzan la voz para cambiar el curso de la historia.
  • En la categoría de estudiantes, el primer lugar se le asignó a: “Xuacha Lucha Femenina y Popular” de Jeimmy Lorena Gutiérrez Turmequé – disponible en: https://www.ivoox.com/xuacha-lucha-femenina-popular-audios-mp3_rf_55835207_1.html?f[…]=IwAR2NEaQogHqB08Bdxw4tDlsXAQ2ZnSiFCfI5KYu62LY0Si8lSoXMGQHCltA
    Este podcast cuenta las historias de cuatro líderes comunitarios que han estado luchando por la reivindicación de los derechos de las mujeres y la construcción de paz en el municipio de Xuacha, Cundinamarca. Xuacha es visto como un lugar donde convergen todos los problemas, pero en simultáneo, presenta un halo de esperanza personificado en estos líderes populares. El podcast presenta un tipo de liderazgo que da cuenta del significado y la importancia de la RCSNU 1325 sobre el terreno local.

Finalmente, el premio especial se le otorgó a Jeimmy Lorena Gutiérrez Turmequé. La pieza de la estudiante describe claramente los esfuerzos de las mujeres líderes para continuar con su trabajo en medio de las crecientes amenazas y las barreras que se imponen – como el aumento de la violencia de género, el asesinato de líderes sociales y las desigualdades causadas por las políticas económicas neoliberales. La contribución fundamental del material reside en destacar la importancia del movimiento de las mujeres y los líderes comunitarios; dos actores frecuentemente ignorados por los principales medios de comunicación, pero que son sin embargo esenciales para prevenir conflictos, promover la paz y la estabilidad en los territorios.

¡GNWP felicita a los ganadores, y a todos los que participaron en el concurso! Este es un paso clave para fortalecer la alianza entre los medios de comunicación y las mujeres constructoras de paz con el fin de concientizar y promover los valores centrales de la agenda MPS. ¡Esperamos poder continuar fortaleciendo aún más esta asociación en un futuro!

See Us, Hear Us, Join Us! Women Peacebuilders in Colombia Defy COVID-19 and Promote Inclusive Peace

November 30, 2020

By Beatriz Ciordia and Cecilia Lazara

Edited by Agnieszka Fal-Dutra Santos

“We will never be seen as changemakers if the public does not see, read or listen about the work that we, as women, do in our communities”, noted women’s rights activist and a member of the Red Nacional de Mujeres (National Women’s Network; RNM) Vanessa Liévano during a Localization of Women, Peace and Security (WPS) workshop held in December 2019 in Popayán. Popayán is the capital of Cauca, one of the departments most affected by the decades-long conflict in Colombia. The workshop was organized by the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (GNWP) in partnership with RNM and Red Departamental de Mujeres de Cauca (Departmental Network of Women in Cauca), and with the support of the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad). Liévano’s words resonate even louder today, in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic – a public health crisis that has had severe impacts on women’s rights, human security and peace in Colombia. The pandemic has exacerbated gender inequalities, put women at a greater risk of violence, and created new challenges for the implementation of the peace agreement between the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia, FARC).

Despite these challenges, women and youth peacebuilders in Colombia have been at the forefront of the response to the intersecting health, humanitarian and security crises caused by COVID-19. RNM supported women peacebuilders to prepare and distribute food packages, hygiene and reproductive health products, such as contraceptive pills, condoms and pregnancy tests, to women and girls, the elderly, people with disabilities, refugees, and internally displaced persons. RNM collaborated with the indigenous guard to make sure that the packages reach indigenous women and girls living in remote areas. In parallel, women activists have also continued their peacebuilding work, monitoring the peace agreement implementation, translating local needs into concrete policy proposals, and advocating for the inclusion of gender-responsive provisions in local development plans.

However, illustrating the truth of Vanessa Liévano’s words, the work of Colombian women to address COVID-19 and its impacts remains largely unseen and unsupported. Against this background, women peacebuilders warn that the pandemic threatens the achievements of the women’s movement and the WPS agenda. Their message is clear: we cannot afford to back down. The implementation of the peace agreement and WPS agenda needs to continue despite the new and growing challenges. Peace simply cannot wait!

Peace in Colombia is more fragile than ever

The signing of the peace agreement between the Colombian Government and the FARC in 2018 was a great achievement for the women’s movement in the country. The agreement, which includes more than 120 gender-responsive provisions, has been hailed internationally as an example of good practice. Its strength came to a large extent from the contributions of women—both as negotiators and civil society. However, as a 2018 Kroc Institute report points out, the implementation of the agreement has been slow, and there have been many delays, especially on the implementation of gender-responsive provisions. The delays are partly due to the failure of President Iván Duque and his administration to make progress on key elements of the agreement, including the reintegration of the former combatants and the rural economic reform.

Women peacebuilders are concerned that the COVID-19 pandemic will further slow down the already delayed implementation. They warn that resources are diverted from peace agreement implementation to emergency health response. They also urge that adoption and implementation of the development plans at the municipal, departmental and national levels must not be delayed due to the pandemic, since they are key instruments in translating the peace agreement into concrete actions on the ground. “The current crisis is being used as an excuse not to address issues related to peace. For [the government], there’s only one priority: the pandemic”, says Francy Jaramillo, a member of the Red Departmental de Mujeres del Cauca. Women who participated in a recent research conducted by GNWP stressed that pandemic was used as an excuse to channel funds away from the transitional justice institutions established under the peace agreement, including the Special Jurisdiction for Peace, making their work more difficult.

Colombia’s fragile peace is further endangered by the ongoing fighting among armed groups to control key territories. During the pandemic, the groups have moved to consolidate their power, and fighting intensified in many departments. In Cauca, armed groups imposed confinement measures on local communities. In most cases, these restrictions were more severe than those imposed by the national government. In Popayán, for instance, armed groups dictated who was allowed to leave and enter certain territories, leaving women and communities completely at their mercy. “We now have to face two crises: the ongoing, worsening conflict in Colombia, and the new COVID-19 crisis”, Jaramillo stressed.

The armed groups have also stepped up their recruitment during the pandemic. The closure of schools and daycare centers has made children and young women and men more vulnerable, and allowed armed groups to easily recruit and exploit girls and boys, who no longer have the protection of a classroom. There has also been a spike in the number of girls and women killed by firearms in rural areas, where clashes between criminal groups have increased dramatically. All of this has made the peace in Colombia more fragile than ever.

Colombian women are under threat during the pandemic

In parallel, COVID-19 has exacerbated threats faced by women and girls in Colombia, many of whom have become targets of unprecedented levels of violence, especially in rural areas. According to Indepaz, a local watchdog organization, at least 251 community and human rights leaders have been murdered in Colombia in 2020. The number of femicides increased at an extremely alarming rate  in September, when 86 women were murdered across the country—the highest monthly total since 2017. Cauca continues to be one of the most dangerous departments for women peacebuilders and human rights defenders. According to Jaramillo, since the beginning of the pandemic, 38 femicides have been registered in this department. Yet, like the work done by women peacebuilders, the attacks on women remain invisible, and many of the cases have not been reported by the media.

The lockdown measures implemented by the government have further exposed women to risk, as many of them found themselves trapped with their abusers. As a result, the domestic violence hotline (“linea purpura”) in Bogotá received twice as many reports of domestic violence during the lockdown as before. Moreover, as Colombia was put under lockdown to stop the spread of the deadly virus, many women were unable to carry out their work and advocacy. They had to give up the independence and freedom they had fought so hard for. “I don’t know if we’ll manage to make women leave their homes and become politically active again”, shared Jaramillo, adding that the situation is even more challenging for indigenous women. “Many of them tell us that, for them, there is no pandemic because they’ve always lived like this”.

The COVID-19 pandemic has also exposed the gendered digital gap and the inequalities that persist between rural and urban areas in Colombia. Due to the lack of internet connectivity in remote areas, many rural women were unable to actively participate in the advocacy for the implementation of the peace agreement, and better protection of women activists. This affected particularly indigenous and Afro-Colombian communities, which had more limited access to technology, and capacity to make use of it, before the pandemic. Access to technology has become a basic right; therefore, it is essential to expand platforms to amplify the voices of women and girls at all levels.

An opportunity for mobilization and Innovation

At the same time, COVID-19 has also demonstrated the resilience of the women’s movement. Despite the challenges and the barriers in access to the digital spaces, women peacebuilders did not stop their work. According to Jaramillo, “the women’s movement has been strengthened as we resort to alternative strategies; this serves as a push for a more connected movement”. Women peacebuilders who participated in virtual convenings organized by GNWP and RNM pointed out that citizen involvement did not stop during COVID-19, and that some women feel more comfortable in the new situation, as they have the possibility to turn off their videos and express their feelings in a safe environment. “The pandemic can divide us physically, but it does not silence us”, said one of the participants of the Localization workshops in Cauca during one of the weekly virtual meetings RNM and GNWP held to monitor the progress of the peace agreement.

Women in Colombia and around the world are using the pandemic as an opportunity to call for structural changes needed to build sustainable and inclusive peace. These include:

  • Valuing women’s unpaid work

Beatriz Quintero, head of RNM, agrees that the health crisis has contributed to bringing more attention to women’s care work. “One positive side of this pandemic is that Colombians have finally started talking about women’s unpaid work”, she reflected, adding that “policy-makers must recognize the value of what has been considered a natural female task”. Additionally, feminists groups are also seizing this moment to advocate for more equitable economic policies that allow women in the informal sector to have more job security and receive pensions and other social benefits.

  • Shifting from militarized culture to human security

COVID-19 also creates an opportunity to re-evaluate global priorities. The record-high global military expenditure in 2019  has not stopped the health crisis, nor made anyone safer during COVID-19. On the contrary, the pandemic has brought to light the dangers of over-militarized cultures, including the abuse of power. Jaramillo shared that although “the military forces have always abused power in Colombia”, the distrust between the security forces and Colombian society has deepened since the pandemic.

  • Recognizing and amplifying women’s leadership

Women’s work can no longer be obscured by patriarchal narratives and approaches. As Liévano emphasized during the Localization workshop held by GNWP and RNM in December 2019, it is of utmost importance to recognize the efforts made by women peacebuilders to achieve sustainable and inclusive peace in their communities, especially during these challenging times.

At GNWP, we believe that journalists and media practitioners are critical allies in our fight for the recognition and advancement of women’s rights and sustainable and inclusive peace. They can define the way people perceive women and girls, either representing them as sex objects and helpless victims, or highlighting their agency and leadership. Unfortunately, the dominant narrative usually portrays women as passive victims in need of protection, rather than promoting their role as active agents for peace.

To challenge this perspective, GNWP and RNM, in partnership with Pacifista and with the support of Norad, launched a National Media and WPS Prize, to encourage journalists to write, film and record stories that promote women’s leadership in the peace process and showcase their relentless activism. Look out for our next blog sharing the results of the Prize!

COVID-19 gave rise to unprecedented challenges to peace, and to women’s rights, in Colombia and around the world. However, it also provides an opportunity to reflect on what type of future we hope for – and how to achieve it. Colombian women we engaged through GNWP’s Localization work want a peaceful world that has overcome unequal gender barriers, a world where women’s voices are heard, and their leadership capacity is justly recognized.

GNWP’s experience working with women peacebuilders around the world tells us that this is possible – but only if women are meaningfully included and their relentless work for just and equal societies recognized and supported. We are committed to continue our efforts towards this future. To our members and partners who are leading this change in Colombia and beyond, we say: we see you, we hear you and we are with you!


¡Mírenos, escúchenos, únase a nosotras! Mujeres constructoras de paz en Colombia desafían al COVID-19 y promueven una paz inclusiva.

30 de noviembre de 2020

Por Beatriz Ciordia y Cecilia Lazara

Editado por Agnieszka Fal-Dutra Santos

 “Nunca podremos ser reconocidas como agentes de cambio si otros no ven, leen o escuchan sobre el trabajo que nosotras, como mujeres, hacemos en nuestras comunidades”, señaló la activista por los derechos de las mujeres y miembro de la Red Nacional de Mujeres (RNM) Vanessa Liévano durante el taller de Localización sobre Mujeres, Paz y Seguridad (MPS) realizado en diciembre de 2019 en Popayán. Popayán es la capital del Cauca, uno de los departamentos más afectados por el conflicto armado de Colombia. El taller fue organizado por la Red Global de Mujeres Constructoras de Paz (GNWP, por sus siglas en inglés) en colaboración con RNM y la Red Departamental de Mujeres de Cauca, y con el apoyo de la Agencia Noruega para Cooperación al Desarrollo (Norad). Hoy en día, las palabras de Liévano resuenan aún más fuerte en medio de la pandemia de COVID-19 – una crisis de salud pública que ha causado un severo impacto sobre los derechos de las mujeres, la seguridad humana y la paz en Colombia. La pandemia ha exacerbado las desigualdades de género, ha puesto a las mujeres en mayor riesgo de violencia y ha creado nuevos desafíos para la implementación del acuerdo de paz con las Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC).

A pesar de estos desafíos, en Colombia, las mujeres, así como las jóvenes y los jóvenes constructores de paz, han estado a la vanguardia de la respuesta a las crisis entrecruzadas de salud, humanitarias y de seguridad causadas por COVID-19. RNM ha estado apoyando a las mujeres constructoras de paz, preparando y distribuyendo paquetes de alimentos y productos de higiene y salud reproductiva (como píldoras anticonceptivas, condones y pruebas de embarazo) a mujeres y niñas, ancianos, personas con discapacidad, refugiados y desplazados internos. RNM también ha colaborado ​​con la guardia indígena para asegurarse de que los paquetes lleguen a las mujeres y niñas indígenas que viven en áreas remotas. Paralelamente, las mujeres activistas también han continuado su trabajo de consolidación de paz, monitoreando la implementación del acuerdo, traduciendo las necesidades locales en propuestas de políticas concretas y abogando por la inclusión de disposiciones con enfoque de género en los planes de desarrollo local.

Sin embargo, como bien ha señalado Vanessa Liévano, el trabajo de las mujeres colombianas para abordar el COVID-19 y sus impactos permanece en gran parte invisible y sin respaldo. En este contexto, las mujeres constructoras de paz advierten que la pandemia amenaza los logros del movimiento de mujeres y la agenda MPS. Por tanto, su mensaje es claro: no podemos darnos el lujo de dar marcha atrás. La implementación del acuerdo de paz y la agenda MPS debe continuar a pesar de los nuevos y crecientes desafíos. ¡La paz simplemente no puede esperar!

La paz en Colombia, más frágil que nunca

La firma del acuerdo de paz entre el Gobierno de Colombia y las FARC en el 2018 fue un gran logro para el movimiento de las mujeres en el país. El acuerdo, que incluye más de 120 disposiciones con enfoque de género, ha sido aclamado internacionalmente como un ejemplo de buena práctica. En gran medida, su fuerza provino de las contribuciones de las mujeres, tanto como negociadoras así como miembros de la sociedad civil. Sin embargo, como remarca el informe del Instituto Kroc de 2018, la implementación del acuerdo ha sido lenta y ha habido muchos retrasos, especialmente en lo que respecta a las disposiciones con enfoque de género. En parte, las demoras se deben a que el presidente Iván Duque y su administración no han logrado avanzar en elementos clave del acuerdo, tales como la reintegración de los excombatientes y la reforma económica rural.

Una gran preocupación entre las mujeres constructoras de paz es que la pandemia de COVID-19 ralentice aún más la ya demorada implementación. En los últimos tiempos han advertido que los recursos nacionales se han desviado de la implementación del acuerdo hacia la respuesta de emergencia sanitaria. Asimismo, las mujeres exigen el cumplimiento de la adopción e implementación de los planes de desarrollo a nivel municipal, departamental y nacional por temor a que se retrasen debido a la pandemia. Los planes de desarrollo representan instrumentos clave para traducir el acuerdo de paz en acciones concretas sobre el terreno. “La crisis actual se utiliza como excusa para evitar abordar cuestiones relacionadas con la paz. Para [el gobierno], solo hay una prioridad: la pandemia”, explica Francy Jaramillo, integrante de la Red Departamental de Mujeres del Cauca. A su vez, en una investigación realizada por GNWP, las mujeres constructoras de paz han destacado que su trabajo resulta cada vez más difícil debido a que la pandemia se percibe como una excusa para desviar fondos de las instituciones de justicia transicional establecidas en virtud del acuerdo de paz, incluida la Jurisdicción Especial para la Paz.

Paralelamente, el frágil proceso de paz en Colombia se ve aún más amenazado por los constantes combates entre grupos armados que se disputan el control de territorios claves. Durante la pandemia, los grupos se han movilizado para consolidar su poder y la lucha se intensificó en muchos departamentos. En Cauca, por ejemplo, los grupos armados impusieron medidas de confinamiento a las comunidades locales. En la mayoría de los casos, estas restricciones fueron más severas que las impuestas por el gobierno nacional. En Popayán, por otra parte, los grupos armados controlaban a quién se le permitía salir y entrar en ciertos territorios, dejando a las mujeres y comunidades completamente a su merced. “Ahora tenemos que enfrentar dos crisis: el conflicto en curso en Colombia y la nueva crisis del COVID-19”, enfatizó Jaramillo.

Lamentablemente también se ha intensificado el reclutamiento por parte de los grupos armados durante la pandemia. El cierre de escuelas y guarderías ha aumentado la vulnerabilidad de los niños, las mujeres y los hombres jóvenes y ha permitido que los grupos recluten y exploten fácilmente a niñas y niños, que no cuentan con la protección de un aula. A su vez, se ha producido un aumento en el número de niñas y mujeres asesinadas por armas de fuego en las zonas rurales, donde los enfrentamientos entre grupos criminales han aumentado de manera dramática. Todos estos hechos demuestran que el proceso de paz de Colombia se encuentra más frágil que nunca.

Mujeres colombianas amenazadas durante la pandemia

COVID-19 ha exacerbado las amenazas que enfrentan las mujeres y niñas en Colombia, muchas de las cuales se han convertido en blanco de niveles de violencia sin precedentes, especialmente en áreas rurales. Según Indepaz, una organización que realiza el monitoreo del conflicto, al menos 251 líderes comunitarios y de derechos humanos han sido asesinados en Colombia durante el 2020. Además, el número de femicidios aumentó a un ritmo extremadamente alarmante. En septiembre, 86 mujeres fueron asesinadas en todo el país, el total mensual más alto desde 2017. El Cauca sigue siendo uno de los departamentos más peligrosos para las mujeres constructoras de paz y defensoras de derechos humanos. Según Jaramillo, desde el inicio de la pandemia se han registrado 38 femicidios en este departamento. Sin embargo, al igual que el trabajo realizado por mujeres constructoras de paz, los ataques a las mujeres permanecen invisibles y muchos de los casos no son reportados por los medios de comunicación.

Las medidas de contención implementadas por el gobierno para detener la propagación del virus mortal han incrementado el riesgo de violencia para las mujeres, ya que muchas de ellas permanecieron atrapadas con sus abusadores. Como resultado, la línea directa de violencia doméstica (“línea púrpura”) en Bogotá recibió el doble de denuncias de violencia doméstica durante el encierro en comparación al período previo a la cuarentena. A su vez, a causa de estas medidas, varias mujeres activistas no pudieron llevar a cabo su trabajo de promoción y defensa por la paz. Tuvieron que renunciar a su independencia y libertad por la que tanto habían luchado. “No sé si lograremos que las mujeres abandonen sus hogares y vuelvan a ser políticamente activas”, compartió Jaramillo, y agregó que la situación es aún más desafiante para las mujeres indígenas. “Muchos nos dicen que, para ellos, no hay pandemia porque siempre han vivido así”.

La pandemia de COVID-19 también ha puesto de manifiesto la brecha digital de género y las desigualdades que persisten entre las zonas rurales y urbanas de Colombia. Debido a la falta de conectividad a Internet en áreas remotas, muchas mujeres rurales no pudieron participar activamente en la promoción para la implementación del acuerdo de paz, y una mejor protección de las mujeres activistas. Esto afectó particularmente a las comunidades indígenas y afrocolombianas, ya que antes de la pandemia tenían un acceso más limitado a la tecnología y a los recursos para su utilización. Como se puede observar, el acceso a la tecnología se ha convertido en un derecho básico; por lo tanto, es fundamental ampliar las plataformas para amplificar las voces de las mujeres y las niñas en todos los niveles posibles.

Una oportunidad para la movilización y la innovación

Simultáneamente, COVID-19 también ha destacado la resistencia del movimiento de mujeres. A pesar de los desafíos y las barreras en el acceso a los espacios digitales, las mujeres constructoras de paz no detuvieron su trabajo. Según Jaramillo, “el movimiento de mujeres se ha fortalecido al recurrir a estrategias alternativas; esto sirve como impulso para un movimiento más conectado”. Las mujeres constructoras de paz que participaron en convocatorias virtuales organizadas por GNWP y RNM señalaron que la participación ciudadana no se suspendió durante el COVID-19, y que algunas mujeres incluso se sienten más cómodas con esta nueva situación, ya que tienen la posibilidad de apagar sus videos y expresar sus sentimientos en un ambiente seguro. “La pandemia puede dividirnos físicamente, pero no nos silencia”, expresó uno de los participantes de los talleres de localización en Cauca durante una de las reuniones virtuales semanales que RNM y GNWP realizaron para monitorear el avance del acuerdo de paz.

Las mujeres en Colombia y en todo el mundo están utilizando la pandemia como una oportunidad para reclamar cambios estructurales necesarios para la construcción de una paz sostenible e inclusiva. Estos cambios incluyen:

  • Valorar el trabajo no remunerado de las mujeres

Beatriz Quintero, directora de RNM, coincide en que la crisis de salud ha contribuido a resaltar el trabajo de cuidado de la mujer. “Un lado positivo de esta pandemia es que los colombianos finalmente han comenzado a hablar sobre el trabajo no remunerado que ejercen las mujeres”, y a su vez agrega que “los legisladores deben reconocer el valor de lo que se ha considerado una tarea natural de las mujeres”. Asimismo, los grupos feministas también están aprovechando este momento para abogar por políticas económicas más equitativas que permitan a las mujeres en el sector informal tener más seguridad laboral y recibir pensiones y otros beneficios sociales.

  • Pasar de una cultura militarizada a una cultura que tenga en cuenta la seguridad humana

COVID-19 también crea una oportunidad para reevaluar las prioridades globales. El gasto militar mundial récord durante el 2019 no ha detenido la crisis de salud ni ha garantizado una mayor seguridad para los individuos. Por el contrario, la pandemia ha develado los peligros de las culturas sobre-militarizadas, incluido el abuso de poder. Jaramillo compartió que aunque “las fuerzas militares siempre han abusado del poder en Colombia”, la desconfianza entre las fuerzas de seguridad y la sociedad colombiana se ha profundizado desde el inicio de la emergencia sanitaria.

  • Reconocer y ampliar el liderazgo de las mujeres

El trabajo de las mujeres no puede seguir oculto detrás de narrativas y enfoques patriarcales. Como bien destacó Liévano durante el taller de localización celebrado por GNWP y RNM en diciembre de 2019, es esencial que se reconozcan los esfuerzos realizados por las mujeres constructoras de paz para lograr una paz sostenible e inclusiva en sus comunidades, especialmente durante estos tiempos desafiantes.

En GNWP, creemos que los periodistas y los profesionales de los medios de comunicación son aliados fundamentales en nuestra lucha por el reconocimiento y el avance de los derechos de las mujeres y una paz sostenible e inclusiva. Estos actores pueden definir la forma en que las personas perciben a las mujeres y las niñas, ya sea representándolas como objetos sexuales y víctimas indefensas, o destacando su agencia y liderazgo. No obstante, desafortunadamente, la narrativa dominante suele presentar a las mujeres como víctimas pasivas que necesitan protección, en lugar de promover su papel como agentes activos para la paz.

Para desafiar esta perspectiva, GNWP y RNM, en asociación con Pacifista y con el apoyo de Norad, lanzaron un Premio Nacional de Medios y MPS. Su objetivo principal fue alentar a los periodistas a escribir, filmar y grabar historias que promuevan el liderazgo de las mujeres en el proceso de paz y muestren su implacable activismo. ¡Estén atentos a nuestro próximo blog que compartirá los resultados del Premio!

COVID-19 generó desafíos sin precedentes para la paz y los derechos de las mujeres en Colombia y en el mundo. Sin embargo, también representa una oportunidad para reflexionar sobre el tipo de futuro que deseamos y cómo lograrlo. Las mujeres colombianas, que tuvimos el placer de conocer a través del trabajo de localización de GNWP, desean un mundo pacífico que haya superado las barreras de género desiguales; un mundo donde se escuchen sus voces y se reconozca con justicia su capacidad de liderazgo.

La experiencia de GNWP, trabajando con mujeres constructoras de paz en todo el mundo, nos dice que esto es posible – pero sólo si se incluye a las mujeres de manera significativa y se reconoce y apoya su incansable trabajo para construir sociedades justas e igualitarias. Estamos comprometidas para continuar nuestros esfuerzos para avanzar hacia este futuro. A todxs nuestrxs miembrxs y aliadxs globales que están liderando este cambio en Colombia y más allá, les queremos decir que: ¡lxs vemos, lxs escuchamos y estamos con ustedes!